close
Archive by Category "Featured"

Featured

category
Climate2020-logo-on-transparent3-768x813
by:

NAU joins with ASU, UA and Arizona communities to confront climate crisis As Arizona confronts the impacts of a hotter world, Northern Arizona University is joining partners from Arizona State University, the University of Arizona and communities from throughout the state to convene the first statewide, solutions-focused climate summit. Climate 2020: Seven Generations for Arizona is a two-day event that will bring together youth, community leaders, decisionmakers and researchers Nov. 15-16 in Flagstaff. The summit will feature nationally-recognized voices on climate issues including Texas Tech scientist Katharine Hayhoe, hip-hop artist Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, and former Governor of Arizona and Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt. “Arizonans have a long tradition of coming together in moments of urgency, and our quickly changing climate presents us with another one: larger and more frequent wildfires, prolonged drought, extreme heat and reduced snowpack are already changing life in this state,”...
by:

Wired red oak is first of its kind in North America. As trees across the U.S. continue their picturesque march toward autumn, one 100-year-old oak tree in Massachusetts is attracting a crowd of admirers online. The tree is a scientific wonder—not because of its unique looks or a special way it grows, but because of its voice. The idea for the Harvard Forest Witness Tree, a social media outreach project led by post-doctoral fellow Tim Rademacher of Northern Arizona University and Harvard University, began as a public outreach component of a study investigating the effect of environmental changes on wood growth, funded by the National Science Foundation. “The tree is wired with sensors that measure its growth, sap flow, local climate, and other factors in real-time,” says Rademacher. “Because we were measuring these things anyway, we thought, why not use...
Peltier_GCT_Flux Puppy
by:

Ecoss postdoc Drew Peltier led a 2 hour class on tree ring science and climate change at Mangum Ranch on the North rim of the Grand Canyon. Drew joined a Grand Canyon Trust Climate change research trip, where Flagstaff High school students were helping with climate change research at the Southwest Experimental Garden Array (SEGA) sites. Students learned about how trees store energy, why trees form tree rings, what tree rings can tell us about the future, and how to core a tree. Other links: https://www.grandcanyontrust.org/projects-climate-change-research
IPCCdelegate_photo_Monaco2019
by:

The world’s oceans are getting hotter and acidifying under climate change at unprecedented rates, threatening coastal and high-mountain communities, marine ecosystems, and global fishing stocks, according to a new Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC) released this week by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Ted Schuur, of the Center for Ecosystem Science and Society (Ecoss), was one of the lead authors on the report’s polar regions chapter, which synthesized research on the Arctic and Antarctic oceans, ice, glaciers, and permafrost. Sea levels rose throughout last century, but the report found they are rising twice as fast over the last two decades, accelerated by warming temperatures, glacial and ice sheet melt, and loss of sea ice. Coastal communities around the world, including many Indigenous communities in the Arctic, are already experiencing challenges...
Walker_Nature_paper_2019_4_3
by:

Pools of old carbon in the soil of boreal forests historically safe from combustion are being released by more frequent and larger wildfires, an Ecoss team led by Xanthe Walker and Michelle Mack announced in Nature this week. As the climate of these forests in the Northwest Territories of Canada becomes warmer, drier and prone to more frequent fires, the combustion of “legacy carbon,” as the research team calls it, has the potential to shift the global carbon cycle, as boreal forests that have acted as carbon sinks for millennia become sources of atmospheric carbon. Read the NAU news story here and the publication here Graphics by Victor O. Leshyk
by:

Ecoss' Bruce Hungate and Victor Leshyk co-authored a study on the "CO2 fertilization effect". The study was led by César Terrer and Rob Jackson and published in Nature Climate Change. Although excessive CO2 often harms forests by warming the planet, making droughts more severe and insect pests more abundant, CO2 in the air is also food for plants. Extra carbon on a plant’s plate will usually increase photosynthesis and biomass—but only to a point. The more carbon dioxide concentrations rise, the less additional benefit trees may receive unless they can find additional nitrogen and phosphorus to balance their diet." How much extra carbon dioxide trees will take up this century is a critical uncertainty in predicting global warming. Will trees keep absorbing a quarter or so of fossil-fuel emissions, as they do today. Read the paper here and an article...
by:

The research team, led by Bradley Butterfield from NAU’s Center for Ecosystem Science and Society (Ecoss) and including Scott Anderson from the School of Earth and Sustainability, found that a plant’s evolutionary build—its growth form (tree vs. shrub) and how its seeds are dispersed—are strong predictors of how quickly it can move to a more favorable climate when its current one becomes hotter or drier. Their findings sync with other studies about how plant species disperse over shorter distances and time periods, and provide guideposts for predicting which plants are most climate-mobile. The clues on which Butterfield and his collaborators from SUNY-Buffalo and the U.S. Geological Survey relied come in the form of ancient middens—the nests that packrats make with nearby plant material and inadvertently fossilize with their urine, called amberat. By analyzing data about what types of seeds and...
Plaza_publication_illustration
by:

Ecoss researchers show that more carbon is being released from thawed permafrost than previously thought. A new paper published this month in Nature Geoscience introduces a new way to track soil carbon in permafrost, which changes the understanding of how environmental change influences ecosystem carbon storage. The experiment builds on a long-term permafrost tundra warming study Schuur and collaborators are doing in Alaska. Read the publication here and the NAU news story here. Thawing permafrost affects plant and soils in tundra ecosystems, and ultimately the storage of carbon in permafrost soils. The surface of tundra subsides as ice in permafrost melts and drains. This can mask the loss of soil carbon through time that occurs as a result of soil microbial activity converting soil organic matter into greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane. Accounting for ground subsidence as a result...
Luo C model course 2019
by:

Much of what we know about where carbon will be on the globe in 12, 25 or 100 years is due to innovative predictive modeling tools like the ones researcher Yiqi Luo develops at Northern Arizona University’s Center for Ecosystem Science and Society (Ecoss). The short course taught by Luo and nearly 30 students, staff, and faculty from NAU and other institutions, now in its second year, expanded to cover two new topics: ecological forecasting and data assimilation. Luo said his group expanded into these areas in order to make the course more useful for trainees working to improve their models’ predictions. Read the full article here
Girls who code
by:

Girls code. In Flagstaff, thanks to the efforts of Ecoss/SICCS postdoc and club founder Katharyn Duffy. Check out this great Arizona Daily Sun story about the new Girls Who Code club in Northern Arizona and Duffy's plans for expanding the after-school club next year!
1 2 3 6
Page 1 of 6